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Recreational Water

Project

Coastal waters, fresh water and other untreated recreational water venues

Recreational water venues such as oceans, lakes, and rivers, attract large numbers of users. Usage is higher in the summer months, although recreational water activities such as swimming, water skiing, surfing, wakeboarding etc., can take place year-round. These venues are not subject to specific legislation the way that man-made treated recreational water venues such as swimming pools and hot...

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Pools, hot tubs, and other treated recreational water venues

Public swimming pools, hot tubs, splash parks, wading pools, and other treated recreational water facilities are popular recreational water venues, which are regulated at the provincial or territorial level. In most provinces there is legislation specific to these facilities that provide criteria for their design, construction, and ongoing operation (www.canlii.org). Despite having these criteria...

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Document

March 2018 Environmental Health Research Scan

Full Scan  The attached PDF version of the Research Scan has over 100 references and is broken into over 30 categories. Editor’s Picks After searching through the dozens of articles referenced in the scan, our librarian picks the ones she feels may be especially interesting to our stakeholders.  Her “Editor Picks” for March 2018 include: Wildfires, emergency preparedness, and the importance of...

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April 2018 Environmental Health Research Scan

Full Scan The attached PDF version of the Research Scan has over 100 references and is broken into over 30 categories. Editor’s Picks After searching through the dozens of articles referenced in the scan, our librarian picks the ones she feels may be especially interesting to our stakeholders.  Her “Editor Picks” for April 2018 include: The built environment: Understanding how physical...

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February 2018 Environmental Health Research Scan

Full Scan The attached PDF version of the Research Scan has over 100 references and is broken into over 30 categories. Editor’s Picks After searching through the dozens of articles referenced in the scan, our librarian picks the ones she feels may be especially interesting to our stakeholders.  Her “Editor Picks” for February 2018 include: A review of the experimental evidence on the...

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January 2018 Environmental Health Research Scan

Full Scan The attached PDF version of the Research Scan has over 100 references and is broken into over 30 categories. Editor’s Picks After searching through the dozens of articles referenced in the scan, our librarian picks the ones she feels may be especially interesting to our stakeholders.  Her “Editor Picks” for January 2018 include: Adverse effects after medical, commercial, or self-...

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Cemetery Setback Distances to Prevent Surface Water Contamination

Primary inquiry: In Canada, as in many other countries, cemeteries are required to be setback a certain distance from waterbodies to protect drinking water sources from contaminated liquids that can arise from the decomposition of bodies after burial. What is recommended as a safe setback distance? What is the rationale for the setback distances used throughout Canada?

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Identifying and Addressing the Public Health Risks of Splash Parks

Splash parks, also known as splash pads, spray parks, or wet decks, have gained in popularity over the last decade. These interactive parks are artificially created depressions or basins into which water is sprayed, splashed or poured onto visitors; water is not permitted to accumulate, but instead drains immediately out of the play area. Splash parks may take one of two basic designs, which...

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Float Tanks: Review of Current Guidance and Considerations for Public Health Inspectors

The growing popularity of “floatation” and the ways in which this practice differs from the use of pools and spas have raised interesting questions in environmental public health. Public health agencies in the US and Canada have taken very different approaches to the classification and regulation (or non-regulation) of these facilities. Continuing engagement amongst environmental health...

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Float Tanks: Considerations for Environmental Public Health

Floatation refers to a meditative activity in which users float in a high-density Epsom salt solution in a dark, quiet environment. Because float tanks are distinct from swimming pools and other recreational water, questions have been raised regarding the need for and efficacy of various disinfection methods. Although direct evidence is lacking, pathogen kill assays and field studies from...

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Pool Chlorination and Closure Guidelines

As an EH director at a local health authority, helping to review provincial guidelines on swimming pools, you want to know if scientific evidence supports pool closure orders when free available chlorine (FAC) is found to be at or above 10 ppm. Should the level be different and are there other factors to be considered for closure, instead of or in addition to FAC? What is Free Available Chlorine...

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Workshops Presentations

Splash Parks: Understanding the Risk and Implementing Better Practice

This presentation was delivered at the 83rd CIPHI National Annual Education Conference and was created in conjunction with Chris Russell an Environmental Health Specialist from the BC Interior Health authority. It provides an overview of the risks associated with splash parks and it describes some of the best practices regarding the design and operation of these kinds of facilities.

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Fires, Floods, and Bugs: How Climate Change Impacts Drinking Water Source Quality

Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI) 82nd Annual National Educational Conference.  Climate change is anticipated to have myriad potential impacts on human health, some of which may be difficult to predict. However, the effects of climate change on ground and surface water, and the concomitant risk to human health through disruptions to drinking water, have been the subject of...

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Event

Third Edition of the Model Aquatic Health Code

Michael Beach, PhD, Associate Director for Healthy Water at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will give an overview of the third edition of the Model Aquatic Health Code.The Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) is a voluntary guidance document based on science and best practices that can help local and state authorities and the aquatics sector make swimming and other water activities...

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NCCEH eJournal Club - Water Quality Survey of Splash Pads After a Waterborne Salmonellosis Outbreak

The NCCEH eJournal Club is a series of informal hour-long sessions discussing and appraising articles relating to environmental health. Active participation is encouraged. Although these sessions are directed at public health inspectors, anyone interested in a given topic is more than welcome to take part. Remote viewing instructions are available on the Eventbrite registration page. Title of...

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Building Safe & Inclusive Communities: The Public Health Approach

The annual conference is designed to help attendees learn new methods of fostering safe, healthy and inclusive communities by showcasing the latest work and research within the realm of public health and beyond. Some topics that will be discussed include: Violence prevention at the individual & societal level, health equity, health literacy, fostering healthy relationships, keeping...

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The Ontario Public Health Convention (TOPHC)

TOPHC 2019 will explore how strategy, leadership and practice align to address changes in the public health sector. Discover tools and approaches to move knowledge into practice, refresh your knowledge at thought-provoking sessions and collaborate with colleagues motivated to build healthier and more sustainable communities. 

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