You are here

Emergency Response

Project

Extreme Heat

According to Environment Canada, a heat wave is a period of more than 3 days when temperatures are more than 32°C (Health Canada, 2012); the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines excessive heat events as “summertime temperatures that are substantially hotter and/or more humid that average for a location for that time of year”(US EPA, 2016). Due to climate change, by 2050, cities...

View Full Article

Floods: prevention, preparedness, response and recovery

A number of extreme flooding events have occurred in Canada over the last few decades, and as a result of climate change, are growing in both frequency and magnitude. Manitoba experienced intense flooding in 1997 which resulted in the relocation of 25,450 evacuees and damage to more than 1,000 homes – extreme floods occurred again in the province in 2009 and 2011. A few years later in 2013,...

View Full Article

Wildfire Smoke and Health

Background The frequency and intensity of Canadian wildfires is increasing as a consequence of the changing global climate, as well as long-standing forest management practices (Flannigan et al., 2013). Fires pose a direct threat to lives and properties in some communities, and also cause episodes of extreme smoke pollution that threaten the health of populations over large geographic areas....

View Full Article

Indigenous Disaster Response

Background First Nations communities may be disproportionately impacted by a variety of emergencies and disasters, including floods, wildfires, and crude oil spills in their traditional territories. This may be the result of several key factors, including: Logistical difficulties in providing emergency services to remote or isolated communities. Variability in local administrative and technical...

View Full Article

Document

Guidance for the Environmental Public Health Management of Crude Oil Incidents

Crude oil spills/releases, alone or in combination with combustion/explosion of the oil, have been the cause of several major disasters in Canada and around the world including the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the 1989 grounding of the Exxon Valdez . The 2013 Lac-Mégantic, QC derailment was the most significant disaster involving crude oil in Canadian history, and left 47 dead, a...

View Full Article

Event

Declaring a Climate Change Emergency: Process, Considerations & Legalities

Floods, fires, and severe climate are becoming increasingly more common.  As the owners and operators of local infrastructure, municipalities have much to lose from the damaging effects - not only financially, but there are significant health and environmental costs as well. Furthermore, the impact of climate change is most immediate and dramatic in Northern communities, where global warming is...

View Full Article

The Ontario Public Health Convention (TOPHC)

TOPHC 2019 will explore how strategy, leadership and practice align to address changes in the public health sector. Discover tools and approaches to move knowledge into practice, refresh your knowledge at thought-provoking sessions and collaborate with colleagues motivated to build healthier and more sustainable communities. 

View Full Article

Lessons Learned from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: The Role of Disaster Research Response in Protecting Public Health

Presenter: Dr. Richard Kwok, Chief of Staff (acting), Office of the Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Environmental disasters such as oil spills, hazardous waste releases and other natural and anthropogenic calamities routinely impact public health, yet researchers and studies often arrive too late to be able to collect valuable data that will help us to better...

View Full Article