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Topic Pages

Topic Pages introduce an aspect of the environment and its relation to public health by featuring a curated shortlist of NCCEH and external resources. The most relevant resources related to a topic have been selected to best guide the search for further information. These lists are not intended to be exhaustive, and the omission of any individual resource does not preclude it from having value.

Cannabis Resources for Environmental Health Practitioners

This topic page is intended to help environmental health practitioners understand the guiding principles and public health objectives being used to develop cannabis policy, both federally and across the provinces and territories. It also provides key resources describing the “lessons learned” in non-Canadian jurisdictions with legalized cannabis, as well as information regarding environmental...

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Health Equity and Environmental Public Health Practice

Health equity is achieved when everyone has a fair opportunity to meet their health potential. Health inequities result from systematic disparities in the social determinants of health (the external social, economic, environmental, or political factors that influence their life circumstances). Public health organizations in Canada recognize a role for all public health professionals to advance...

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Health Impact Assessments

A health impact assessment (HIA) is a combination of procedures, methods, and tools that allow for the strategic evaluation and assessment of the health or social impacts of a policy, plan, or project. HIAs provide information to decision-makers and stakeholders about the intended and unintended consequences arising from an activity, and make recommendations to maximize positive and mitigate...

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Carbon Monoxide in Long-Term Care Facilities

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless, and non-irritating gas that is harmful to humans. As a by-product of incomplete combustion, CO is produced by fuel-burning appliances including boilers, furnaces, fireplaces, kitchen stoves, and laundry dryers. Cigarette smoke and vehicle exhaust also contribute to indoor CO levels. At low levels of exposure, symptoms can include headache, nausea...

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